ARCHIVE

June 6 - September 30, 2013
(the second half of the exhibition begins on August 3, 2013)
2500 YEARS OF NIGERIAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
The Nok culture prospered in Jos Plateau of the central Nigeria. In 9th century, the sophisticated bronze-casting tradition of the Igbo Ukwu prospered in Niger Delta. The Ife culture which known as only realistic sculptures in Africa appeared in 10~15th century. In 14~19th century, Benin kingdoms prospered in Southern Nigeria. Each people had characteristic religions or thoughts which were essences to create various deformed sculptures. These were bought to the Europe in the late 19th century. Their artistic sense influenced many artists including Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. The Nigerian art stream introduces the history of African art. This exhibition is consisted with two parts. The first half of the exhibition mainly introduces the Nok, the Sokoto, and the Katsina cultures from B.C., the Ife culture from 12th century, and the Benin culture from 15th century. The second half of the exhibition will introduce characteristic arts of various people.
Nominal Support: The Embassy of Federal Republic of Nigeria, Hokuto City, Hokuto City Board of Education, YBS Yamanashi Broadcast, NHK Koufu, Yamanashi Nichinichi Shinbun, The Asahi Shinbun Kofu General Branch, The Mainichi Daily News Kofu Branch, The daily Yomiuri Kofu Branch, Yamanashi Shinpou, Yatsugatake Journal, and FM Yatsugatake.

The Introduction by
The Embassy of The Federal Republic of Nigeria

The richness and diversity of the Nigerian culture is a manifestation of the sociocultural diversity of the over 250 ethnic groups that inhabit the land. Because of the great diversity of people and culture, Nigeria has distinguished itself over the centuries in the field of arts. Nigerian versatilities in art are so diverse. It is generally felt that it is fairly representative of all African nations. It is not precisely known when the first works of Nigerian art reached the outside world but in 1897, following a British punitive expedition to Benin city in Nigeria, over 2,000 Benin bronzes and ivories were shipped to England and later dispersed all over in Europe and America. However, it may have let to the international recognition for distinguished Nigerian arts. Similar to other African nations, Nigerian arts are also expressed though people’s spirits or life experiences of their past. Since my arrival in Japan five years ago, I have visited some museums where I have learned about the history and life of great Japanese warriors and shoguns. I am sure African Art Museum will equally bring the opportunity for Japanese citizens to learn about African history and culture. I believe that the cultural exchange among the people of different nations is the vehicle for promoting friendship and mutual understanding, which could eventually contribute to solve various international issues. It is in my mind that I applaud the idea of the exhibition at African Art Museum. Especially in the globalized world of ours, people need to know where they are coming or how they are. I hope this exhibition will contribute the Japanese to know what kinds of people the Nigerians are or where they come from.

Embassy of The Federal Republic of Nigeria
H.E Ambassador Godwin N. Agbo

April 1- June 3, 2013
(The second half of the exhibition begins on May 2, 2013)
ART OF COTE D’IVOIRE
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
Cote d’Ivoire is considered the republic located in the West Africa. The country is surrounded by Ghana in the East, Guinea and Liberia in the West, and Brukina Faso in the North. It is bounded on the border of Mali. In addition, the Southern part of the country touches the Atlantic ocean. The total land of Cote d’Ivoire is about 10% smaller than Japan. However, 63 ethnics of diverse people including the Baule, the Guro, the Bete, the Dan, the Malinke, the Senufo, or others inhabit in the country. Various cultures and religions exist among each people that lead establishing ideas and styles of their characteristic art. This exhibition introduces representations of the various Cote d’Ivoire art.
Nominal Support: Embassy of the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire, Hokuto City, Hokuto City Board of Education, YBS Yamanashi Broadcast, NHK Koufu, Yamanashi Nichinichi Shinbun, The Asahi Shinbun Kofu General Branch, The Mainichi Daily News Kofu Branch, The daily Yomiuri Kofu Branch, Yatsugatake Journal, and FM Yatsugatake.

THE INTRODUCTION BY THE AMBASSADOR OF
COTE D'IVOIRE IN JAPAN

From April 1st to June 3rd 2013, the African Art Museum will hold an exhibition devoted to Côte d'Ivoire and entitled “Art of Côte d'Ivoire”.

It was designed to present to the Japanese public Côte d'Ivoire in all its aspects: Culture, Crafts, Art, Gastronomy, Economy, Tourism, Sport, etc.

The current exhibition, and here lies its interest, puts a particular emphasis on the Art of Côte d'Ivoire.

Indeed, the large Japanese public knows more Côte d'Ivoire on the political front, since Japan and Côte d'Ivoire have diplomatic relations for 53 years. It knows also Côte d'Ivoire on the economic front, through the cultivation of cocoa, whose country is the world’s leading producer. Finally it knows Côte d'Ivoire on the sport front through the performance of football player Didier DROGBA.

But does this large public knows Côte d'Ivoire on the Art front? Certainly not as much as in the economic, political and sport fields.

For this reason, I salute the initiative of “the African Art Museum” which so fills a vacuum by devoting to Côte d'Ivoire, and solely to Côte d'Ivoire, an Art exhibition. This initiative is commendable, because it is the first time that the Museum holds an Art exhibition dedicated to a single country and over a period of time.

With this exhibition, the Japanese large public will have the opportunity to discover Côte d'Ivoire in all its cultural diversity. I would therefore like to assure the President of “the African Art Museum” the support of the Embassy to accompany the Museum in this exhibition intended, among other things, to show to the Japanese population, another facet of the cooperation between Japan and Côte d'Ivoire.

I wish a great success to the exhibition “Art of Côte d'Ivoire”.

The ambassador of Côte d'Ivoire in Japan H.E. Mr. Jérôme Klôh WEYA

H.E. Mr. Jérôme Klôh WEYA

October 4 - November 30, 2012
(The second half of the exhibition begins on November 1, 2012)
FANTASTIC GUARDIANSOF AFRICA
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
The various people live in Africa. Each of them has their own myths about their creators. “Guardians” which are uniquely embodied in forms appear depending on their myths. These forms are interesting configurations, expressions, and material textures that attract people’s feelings and emotions. It has the power to influence our hearts and we become captivated by its mysterious beauty. Over several hundred years, each people have selected forms and expressions of “Guardians” which derive from their belief of animism or their roots. Especially, selected forms are inspired by their spirit and we too can experience their hopes of surviving, existing, and living. This exhibition introduces “Guardians” created in the earth of Africa.
Nominal support: Embassy of the Republic of Mali, Embassy of Burkina Faso, Embassy of the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire, Embassy of the Republic of Ghana, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Embassy of the Republic of Cameroon, Embassy of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Embassy of the United Republic of Tanzania, Hokuto City, Hokuto City Board of Education, YBS Yamanashi Broadcast, NHK Koufu, Yamanashi Nichinichi Shinbun, The Asahi Shinbun Kofu General Branch, The Mainichi Daily News Kofu Branch, The daily Yomiuri Kofu Branch, Yatsugatake Journal, and FM Yatsugatake.
May 31 - October 1, 2012
(The second half of the exhibition begins on August 2, 2012)
Animals in African Art
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
Various animals appear in African art. These animals have two large ways to be depicted in the art. One is to be expressed as realistic animals. Another is to represent animals which have several parts of various other animals. These are embodiments of genies in people’s imaginations. Animals sometimes represented genies, spirits, or their messengers. In addition, these often represented the symbol of the royal in Africa. Of course, realistic animals in the European ideals are not seen in African art. However, characteristics of each animal have exaggerated to look more like its species. Animals consisting with parts of different animals are expressed in various forms by different people. Origins of these animals have not known yet. Formative objects with depicting animals have probably often fixed by gifted artists who have appeared during several thousand years. Therefore, these forms have become more fantastic and humorous. The theme of African animals in various arts is introduced in the exhibition.
Nominal support: Embassy of the Republic of Mali, Embassy of Burkina Faso, Embassy of the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire, Embassy of the Republic of Ghana, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Embassy of the Republic of Cameroon, Embassy of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Embassy of the United Republic of Tanzania, Hokuto City, Hokuto City Board of Education, YBS Yamanashi Broadcast, NHK Koufu, Yamanashi Nichinichi Shinbun, The Asahi Shinbun Kofu General Branch, The Mainichi Daily News Kofu Branch, The daily Yomiuri Kofu Branch, Yatsugatake Journal, and FM Yatsugatake.
Click here to catalog information
April 1, 2012 - May 28, 2012
(The second half of the exhibition begins on May 3, 2012)
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
SOFTEN FORMS OF AFRICAN ART
Diverse people live in Africa. They have characteristic forms of chairs. Numerous forms and kinds of chairs exist in the people. Chairs in Africa have two different purposes. One is to sit for a practical usage. Another purpose is to represent their religious or kings’ authority. In addition, some chairs have both purposes together. Generally, each chair is entirely carved from a tree by hand. Also, chairs constructed with separated parts are seen in a part of regions in west Africa. This type of chairs is thought to be carved after the Portuguese visited there in 16th century. However, the chair constructed with separated parts also show African ways of formative senses and ideas. This exhibition introduces various forms of attractive chairs and seated figures as the representations of African cultures.
Nominal support: Embassy of the Republic of Mali, Embassy of Burkina Faso, Embassy of the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire, Embassy of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Embassy of the Republic of Cameroon, Embassy of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Hokuto City, Hokuto City Board of Education, YBS Yamanashi Broadcast, NHK Koufu, Yamanashi Nichinichi Shinbun, The Asahi Shinbun Kofu General Branch, The Mainichi Daily News Kofu Branch, The daily Yomiuri Kofu Branch, Yatsugatake Journal, and FM Yatsugatake.
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